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Archive for the ‘iPad’ tag

Nothing To See Here

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Just testing out the WordPress iPad app… It’s peachy…

Written by johnworthington

June 12th, 2010 at 1:47 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with

Flash On The iPad? Get Real.rm

without comments

Just had a quick thought. Why is no one crying foul over the lack of RealPlayer support on the iPad?

That’s right, it sucks.

Now a lot of content still exists out there in the Real Codec, albeit older stuff. Now to get ‘the full web experience’ as some claim, all devices including Andriod and the ChromeOS must support it.

I have attachment to content, not codec. If Flash ends up on the scrap heap like Real, such is life. We may be having this debate in a few years about HTML5…

The important thing is, the regular punter cares little how his ‘Guy gets hits in nuts’ video is encoded, only that he can see it… Oh, and porn…

J

Written by johnworthington

April 13th, 2010 at 10:19 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with

I Really Hate Using Computers And I Just Like Touching Things.

with 6 comments

I really hate using computers, I just like touching things.
Strap yourselves in kids, this one is a long-winded trip into my past.
My excitement by the release of Apple’s iPad can be easily be clasified by others as simple Apple Fanboism. The reason I push back so hard against this notion is it discounts my long love affair with touch interfaces and my standing hatred of the ‘computer’.
Don’t get me wrong, I love computers, I love my mastery of them… I just hate using a computer.
I love what they can do and what they allow me to create. I hate that a decent amount of background knowledge is required to get the most out of them. I do not roll gleefully in endless sheets of dot-matrix paper skillfully painted with masterpieces of coding. My passion is creating things with them, not things for them.
Despite using Macs from very early in my life at the advertsing agency at which my father worked, my first computer was an Atari ST 1040. I felt so cool having a computer. A computer which I bought with my own money gained from an appearance in a Toyota Lexcen commercial. The first computer we had in our house.
I was so pumped up. I was going to learn programming. I was going to be a computer hacker just like those ones I had read about… But 1 hour in… The fantasy faded away. I was playing games. I was typing letters to friends… I was waiting 10 minutes for the spreadsheet program to load.
This great fantasy I had crafted in my head about WHAT a computer was and what I wasnted to do with them was false. For me a computer was a tool for fun, creativity and communication. The most frustrating part of that expereince was the realisation that in order to do those things, and do them well, I still had to gain a solid level of knowledge about the inner workings of the beige box.
So, with my move to highschool. I got my first Windows PC and a modem. The world opened up for me. Again, the grandious thoughts of going hardcore filled my head. But, I was spending all my time chatting on IRC, playing games and surfing the emerging web.
Once again, I realized that I wasn’t a hardcore computer guy. The only issue was since I had confidence using the computer, I was fast becoming known as ‘the guy who was good with computers’. Anyone who has fixed a simple issue in Word or helped someone with a small task in Windows knows that the projection of confidence goes a long way in your status of ‘Guru’. This required me to level up my knowledge help others, again pulling me deeper than I truly wanted to go.
The biggest gripe about being ‘the computer guy’… viruses. It sucks. You can lobby as hard as you like to get enough money to put in place the best system possible but as soon as some downloads something or clicks on a link in an email etc… you have failed. It’s a lot easier to criticize the computer guy than try and yell at your employees for doing something you don’t truly understand yourself.
So as I moved from high school into University, and being a computer guy, I waded into a double major in Computer Science at Queensland University… and hated it. I could understand everything that was being taught, but my heart just wasn’t in it. I dropped out that year (not before switching to a double major in Philosophy and acing that for 6 months).
Next year I went to TAFE, kind of like practical university. I loved it. Hands on, the social interaction… but again, my heart slipped away.
So I went and got myself a 9 to 5 at a local fertiliser comapny, funnily enough, as their computer guy/graphic artist. It was the perfect job. I got to help people use computers, set up networks and do really practical stuff… without hardcore knowledge. This was also the first time when someone paid me money to use a computer to be creative.
Something I still do today.
So based on my non-hardcore use of the a computer, I just want something that does what I do.
Touch Me Baby
I love touch interfaces. When I use a keyboard or mouse, there is a mental disconnect. There is something very primal about touching something with your finger and it responding.
Anything touch screen I gotta try. The terminals at the malls for customer service. I use the self-service touch screens at my supermarket. Hell, Subway tends to give me gastro but I ordered it once JUST cause they installed new touch screen ordering terminals.
The Ahh-Ha! moment came for me when I found a funky looking phone on eBay from Germany.
The Siemens SX45.
To big to fit on my pocket (but I didn’t care). No microphone or speaker, just a tanglious headphone cord (I didn’t care)… It had a touch screen. While it did have a stylus, I was able to touch the screen and make things happen.
I bought it. $700. My life was complete. Yes it was a crappy Windows Mobile interface but it was tweaked just ever so to allow my big sausage fingers to whip through the menus. It had email, music player, Word, Excel, ‘web-browser’. Heaps of apps. I was like carrying around a brick but I loved it. I had direct control. Part of the reason I am so frickin’ ninja on the iPhone keyboard is I learnt to type on this about 6 years ago.
So I rocked that for a year or so until Rachael and I decided to get Motorola RAZRs. One of the best and worse phones ever (for me). I loved the usability, the camera and the games… but I couldn’t touch it. Phone navigation is hard at the best of times. Throw in sausage fingers and you’re screwed.
Then, one our 2 years were up, I bought my next phone. The LG KU990. It was the SX45 on steroids. It had a fat 5 megapixel camera and a touch interface based on buttons, not menus.
BAM! I had found sort of a computer that WASN’T a computer. It got out of the way and just let me rock the interface to get to where I wanted to go. It was rough but it was enough.
Now at this stage, the iPhone had just been released. For someone like me, Mr Jobs had just given me the next evolution of my dream device… But I didn’t get it year 1. It wasn’t until my fat ass broken the screen on my LG in a slide at a McDonald’s play ground that I got one.
It was the second Ahh-Ha. 95% of what I did on my PC and Mac was now in the palm of my hand and it wasn’t a computer. It had no File/Edit. It had no Maximize/Minimize… It was full screen environments running the task I was performing.
I’ll explain. The major thing I do on a computer is Adobe Lightroom for my photography. When I use it, I switch it to Full Screen mode and the Windows Start Bar or the Mac’s File Menu disappears. I simple use the application, not the OS.
I have used touch tablets before, all Windows devices. My most hardcore use was the set-up and maintenance of a DynaVox eyetracking computer with Windows 95. Despite all the bolted on features, at it’s heart it was the same tablet computer that Windows was selling off the shelf. I know this because when I unpacked it, I had to assemble it all and load the extra software on top of the pre-installed XP. It soon became clear to me that this was still a mouse and keyboard interface that you could touch. The Max/Min/Exit buttons were painfully small and trying to drag and select multiple files at once was almost impossible.
The attachment of a USB keyboard helped but eventually I had to submit and attach a mouse as well. Now, I am sure in future versions (Windows 7) that tweaks have been made but at it’s heart, and tablet OS maker must understand that a straight port without UI tweaks makes it difficult to use. Especially on anything under 13 inches.
I have the exact same criticism of the OSX interface. It is all still menu based and would be the same nightmare to use as Windows.
While my use may not be as hardcore as some, it is still valid and more closely aligned to the general population.
You win no badges for hardcoredness. It’s not what you got, it’s what you do with it.
So, now I have MY phone. The phone I have wanted for 6 years. The computer I have wanted for 20. It fits my work flow, my uses and I trust Apple based on years of solid service. Mr Jobs has stepped up again and said “Here is what you want, Johnny, but more powerful and a bigger screen”.
My answer? 1 please.

Strap yourselves in kids, this one is a long-winded trip into my past.

My excitement by the release of Apple’s iPad can be easily be clasified by others as simple Apple Fanboism. The reason I push back so hard against this notion is it discounts my long love affair with touch interfaces and my standing hatred of the ‘computer’.

Don’t get me wrong, I love computers, I love my mastery of them… I just hate using a computer.

I love what they can do and what they allow me to create. I hate that a decent amount of background knowledge is required to get the most out of them. I do not roll gleefully in endless sheets of dot-matrix paper skillfully painted with masterpieces of coding. My passion is creating things with them, not things for them.

Despite using Macs from very early in my life at the advertsing agency at which my father worked, my first computer was an Atari ST 1040. I felt so cool having a computer. A computer which I bought with my own money gained from an appearance in a Toyota Lexcen commercial. The first computer we had in our house.

I was so pumped up. I was going to learn programming. I was going to be a computer hacker just like those ones I had read about… But 1 hour in… The fantasy faded away. I was playing games. I was typing letters to friends… I was waiting 10 minutes for the spreadsheet program to load.

This great fantasy I had crafted in my head about WHAT a computer was and what I wasnted to do with them was false. For me a computer was a tool for fun, creativity and communication. The most frustrating part of that expereince was the realisation that in order to do those things, and do them well, I still had to gain a solid level of knowledge about the inner workings of the beige box.

So, with my move to highschool. I got my first Windows PC and a modem. The world opened up for me. Again, the grandious thoughts of going hardcore filled my head. But, I was spending all my time chatting on IRC, playing games and surfing the emerging web.

Once again, I realized that I wasn’t a hardcore computer guy. The only issue was since I had confidence using the computer, I was fast becoming known as ‘the guy who was good with computers’. Anyone who has fixed a simple issue in Word or helped someone with a small task in Windows knows that the projection of confidence goes a long way in your status of ‘Guru’. This required me to level up my knowledge help others, again pulling me deeper than I truly wanted to go.

The biggest gripe about being ‘the computer guy’… viruses. It sucks. You can lobby as hard as you like to get enough money to put in place the best system possible but as soon as some downloads something or clicks on a link in an email etc… you have failed. It’s a lot easier to criticize the computer guy than try and yell at your employees for doing something you don’t truly understand yourself.

So as I moved from high school into University, and being a computer guy, I waded into a double major in Computer Science at Queensland University… and hated it. I could understand everything that was being taught, but my heart just wasn’t in it. I dropped out that year (not before switching to a double major in Philosophy and acing that for 6 months).

Next year I went to TAFE, kind of like practical university. I loved it. Hands on, the social interaction… but again, my heart slipped away.

So I went and got myself a 9 to 5 at a local fertiliser comapny, funnily enough, as their computer guy/graphic artist. It was the perfect job. I got to help people use computers, set up networks and do really practical stuff… without hardcore knowledge. This was also the first time when someone paid me money to use a computer to be creative.

Something I still do today.

So based on my non-hardcore use of the a computer, I just want something that does what I do.

Touch Me Baby

I love touch interfaces. When I use a keyboard or mouse, there is a mental disconnect. There is something very primal about touching something with your finger and it responding.

Anything touch screen I gotta try. The terminals at the malls for customer service. I use the self-service touch screens at my supermarket. Hell, Subway tends to give me gastro but I ordered it once JUST cause they installed new touch screen ordering terminals.

The Ahh-Ha! moment came for me when I found a funky looking phone on eBay from Germany.

The Siemens SX45.

To big to fit on my pocket (but I didn’t care). No microphone or speaker, just a tanglious headphone cord (I didn’t care)… It had a touch screen. While it did have a stylus, I was able to touch the screen and make things happen.

I bought it. $700. My life was complete. Yes it was a crappy Windows Mobile interface but it was tweaked just ever so to allow my big sausage fingers to whip through the menus. It had email, music player, Word, Excel, ‘web-browser’. Heaps of apps. I was like carrying around a brick but I loved it. I had direct control. Part of the reason I am so frickin’ ninja on the iPhone keyboard is I learnt to type on this about 6 years ago.

So I rocked that for a year or so until Rachael and I decided to get Motorola RAZRs. One of the best and worse phones ever (for me). I loved the usability, the camera and the games… but I couldn’t touch it. Phone navigation is hard at the best of times. Throw in sausage fingers and you’re screwed.

Then, one our 2 years were up, I bought my next phone. The LG KU990. It was the SX45 on steroids. It had a fat 5 megapixel camera and a touch interface based on buttons, not menus.

BAM! I had found sort of a computer that WASN’T a computer. It got out of the way and just let me rock the interface to get to where I wanted to go. It was rough but it was enough.

Now at this stage, the iPhone had just been released. For someone like me, Mr Jobs had just given me the next evolution of my dream device… But I didn’t get it year 1. It wasn’t until my fat ass broken the screen on my LG in a slide at a McDonald’s play ground that I got one.

It was the second Ahh-Ha. 95% of what I did on my PC and Mac was now in the palm of my hand and it wasn’t a computer. It had no File/Edit. It had no Maximize/Minimize… It was full screen environments running the task I was performing.

I’ll explain. The major thing I do on a computer is Adobe Lightroom for my photography. When I use it, I switch it to Full Screen mode and the Windows Start Bar or the Mac’s File Menu disappears. I simple use the application, not the OS.

I have used touch tablets before, all Windows devices. My most hardcore use was the set-up and maintenance of a DynaVox eyetracking computer with Windows 95. Despite all the bolted on features, at it’s heart it was the same tablet computer that Windows was selling off the shelf. I know this because when I unpacked it, I had to assemble it all and load the extra software on top of the pre-installed XP. It soon became clear to me that this was still a mouse and keyboard interface that you could touch. The Max/Min/Exit buttons were painfully small and trying to drag and select multiple files at once was almost impossible.

The attachment of a USB keyboard helped but eventually I had to submit and attach a mouse as well. Now, I am sure in future versions (Windows 7) that tweaks have been made but at it’s heart, and tablet OS maker must understand that a straight port without UI tweaks makes it difficult to use. Especially on anything under 13 inches.

I have the exact same criticism of the OSX interface. It is all still menu based and would be the same nightmare to use as Windows.

While my use may not be as hardcore as some, it is still valid and more closely aligned to the general population.

You win no badges for hardcoredness. It’s not what you got, it’s what you do with it.

So, now I have MY phone. The phone I have wanted for 6 years. The computer I have wanted for 20. It fits my work flow, my uses and I trust Apple based on years of solid service. Mr Jobs has stepped up again and said “Here is what you want, Johnny, but more powerful and a bigger screen”.

My answer? 1 please.

Written by johnworthington

February 4th, 2010 at 11:24 am

Posted in iPhone

Tagged with ,

Will Facebook have a problem iPadding pixels?

with 2 comments

Since joining Facebook way back in the day, I have always been curious about the pixel limit they set for photographs. At this stage, the longest edge is limited to 604 pixels. This works into their UI.

As a photographer with a lot of photos on Facebook, I have developed my own Lightroom export preset to match this limit and allow for sharpening etc. I am resigned to the fact that no picture I have on Facebook will ever be a higher resolution.

Or will it?

[UPDATED] Thanks to Facebook’s Kevin Fox for pointing me to¬†http://developers.facebook.com/live_status.php#msg_541. Facebook is rolling out an update over the next few weeks that will increase the maximum pixel size to 720. This move is not retroactive. This is still short of the 1024 pixels of the iPad but is a promising move for the largest photo sharing site in the world. [/UPDATED]

With the announcement of Apple’s iPad, and the success of the Facebook app for iPhones and iPods, this has raised a question regarding pixel resolution and the full screen display of photos from said Facebook app.

Currently, the resolution of the iPhone/iPod is 480 x 320 pixels. This is fine as the Facebook app down samples the picture to meet this resolution.

The issue I see is that the reported resolution of the iPad is 1024 x 768 pixels. This would mean that the current pixel restriction of 604 pixels (longest edge) is less than half of that. This would cause the Facebook app to up sample the picture to twice it’s size.

I have produced an approximate up sample example in Photoshop to demonstrate:

facebook

Yuck…

This is important as I like to display and browse photos using the app’s full screen mode. The question the is: Will Facebook’s iPad app display in full screen, the 604 pixel size with black bars around the sides or does Facebook keep higher resolution copies of all photos uploaded?

Knowing the importance of the Facebook app to sales of the iPhone (it has sold more iPhones to my friends than I care to mention) this is something that should be address before the 60 days are up.

J

[Please note, Johnny is quite prepared to be wrong or not understand pixels. Plus correct him on Twitter @jworthington as, alas, the spam bots are pwn'ing my blog. Anti-Apple people need not apply, this is a Facebook issue]

Written by johnworthington

January 31st, 2010 at 5:22 pm

Posted in Facebook, iPhone

Tagged with , ,